Popular antidepressants linked to broken bones in older women

From the moment you hit menopause, you know you’re locked in a battle to save your bones.

You’re exercising. You’re taking your supplements. You’re doing everything you can to avoid a bone break that could rob you of your independence.

But it turns out the greatest threat to your bones may not be menopause, but the drugs many doctors are handing out to “treat” it.

According to a large study published in Injury Prevention, menopausal women who took antidepressants were 76 per cent more likely to suffer a bone break. The drugs in question are known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), like Paxil, Prozac and Zoloft.

SSRIs are regularly handed out to women dealing with the depression, fatigue and irritability of menopause. Throwing meds at these women may be convenient for doctors… and great for the drug companies’ bottom lines… but it’s incredibly dangerous.

That’s because we’ve known for years that excessive serotonin levels — which these drugs promote — can keep your bones from rebuilding and repairing themselves. These SSRIs also come with serious side effects like headaches, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and thoughts of suicide.

And, of course, antidepressants aren’t doing a thing to correct the hormonal imbalances and oestrogen loss that are triggering your hot flashes, mood changes, and many other menopause symptoms.

For many of my female patients, the road to menopause relief starts with bio-identical hormone replacement therapy, or BHRT.

Unlike conventional hormone therapy that uses synthetic or animal-based hormones, bio-identical hormones are biochemically identical to those made by the ovaries during a woman’s reproductive years.

By testing hormone levels — and optimizing them through BHRT — I’m often able to get my female patients feeling like their old selves again in a matter of weeks.

If menopause is making you miserable, find a doctor in your area that specializes in BHRT.

Wishing you the best of health,

Dr. Glenn S. Rothfeld
Editor
Nutrition & Healing
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Sources:

Common antidepressants linked to higher fracture odds in menopausal women, nlm.nih.gov

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